College Football Reorganization

120 Teams in Division I is just too many. Division I teams should be chopped down to about 40. Here are the top 40 teams based on attendance, alumni support, television ratings, and school size. These schools are broken into geographical groups.

Group 1

USC

UCLA

Washington

BYU

California

Arizona State

Arizona

Colorado

Texas

Oregon

Group 2

Wisconsin

Michigan

Ohio State

Minnesota

Illinois

Purdue

Nebraska

Notre Dame

Iowa

Michigan State

Group 3

Penn State

Clemson

North Carolina

North Carolina State

Virginia

Virginia Tech

West Virginia

Kentucky

South Carolina

Tennessee

Group 4

Oklahoma

Auburn

Texas A&M

Missouri

Georgia

LSU

Alabama

Florida

Arkansas

Florida State

Scheduling:

Each team plays every team from their group every season. In addition to that, each team will play one team from each of the other groups. These matchups will be chosen via a seeding process and will be repeated the next year so as to make all games home and home two game series. Every team ends up with a twelve game regular season. This will eliminate pay games and buyouts and all the other seedy things that go along with scheduling. Basically, the NCAA will schedule all your games.

The first three weeks of the season will be the non-group games. These games will have no impact on the group races but will come into play later.

After the season is finished, a champion will have emerged from each group. Ties will be settled via tiebreakers starting with head to head competition. In addition to the champions of each group, three wildcard teams will be chosen from the remaining 36 teams. Also, one team from the 80 teams that did not make it into these super groups will be granted a spot in the playoffs. How that team is chosen is not important, since it will probably get destroyed by the number one seeded team. That team can be chosen via the AP poll or maybe the BCS will still be around to help choose the wildcard teams and the best team of the other 80 schools.

The eight team playoff will begin and will use neutral sites. The sites will similar to the NCAA basketball tournament in that there will be a bidding process to name these sites.

Bowl games can carry on as normal, but they won’t get any of the top eight teams since they will be in the playoff.

Although the list of football powers does not change significantly over time, South Florida just missed the cut. Every two years, the numbers should be run again to determine if the best schools are in the championship groups. Although I doubt more than one or two schools will change, we want to make sure we have the forty most powerful schools in the four championship groups.

Since we’re only dealing with 20 games a weekend, every game will be televised.

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7 comments on “College Football Reorganization

  1. “Although the list of football powers does not change significantly over time,”

    They don’t? You have mistakenly included us in this abortion of a list. You have mistakenly excluded Tech, Kansas, K-State, Boise State, and, wait for it, Miami!

  2. Wow. Just when I thought you were just having intermittent thoughts of stupidity on the blog, you show you really are a moron.

    Let’s go over some of your choices for teams in your little fucked up league:

    Kentucky – They play basketball, never done a thing in football except win one decent game every three years during the REGULAR season.

    Arizona – hot chicks, still suck at football.

    Oregon – did you get paid off by Nike and just want to see a highlighter run around?

    Iowa – the only good thing that comes from there is corn that is used to make bourbon.

    NC and NC St – stupid and fucking stupid.

    I understand you are still pissed about Miami putting on a clinic at Kyle Field; but they are an all time top 20 team.

    As much as you hate Tech, they have to be in there, along with Kansas.

  3. Hold on there, Fran. Take a step back. These teams are being chosen from an economic standpoint. Texas Tech and Miami bring nothing to the table.

    Last year Tech finished in the forties and Miami in the fifties in total attendance numbers, and Tech fielded one of its best teams ever. If people that go to these schools and live around these schools don’t even give a shit about them, then their appeal on a national level is negligible. Miami is a small private school, anyway, and tech is about to lose accreditation. Once these schools are eliminated from major college football, no one will notice their absence. They can still form their own conferences and play games and even go to bowl games, but they aren’t relevant enough to warrant inclusion into the upper echelon of the college football hierarchy. They may be having good years on the field, but off the field they just aren’t important.

    I’m sorry, but those are facts.

  4. Assuming A&M played that schedule this year, it would kill us, and don’t you think it would also reduce season ticket holders?

    Assuming we could beat FL St and Ark, and win the other two “out of conference” games, we would be 4-8.

    IMO we count on some easier games to help our record and keep the fans happy (errr, except for this year). But I do love the idea of big games on TV every weekend!

    WHOOP!

  5. You forgot to mention the fact that Miami has one of the largest national fanbases in the country, and has been involved in the 3 largest watched games on ESPN and the most watched game in the history of college football, Miami vs. Penn State. The Miami brand is a national product. Just because it’s a small private school, and the city of Miami doesn’t support sports, doesn’t mean Miami is worthless to College Football. Infact, Miami helped make College Football what it is now.

  6. Miami can be replaced. The are insignificant. Their bandwagon fans can replace their Miami jerseys with Florida jerseys.

    It’s not a big deal since they have no vested interest in the Hurricane program.

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